The (Somewhat Mental) Recipe for Recruiting An Amazing Team – Part 2

The Wholi Team – Day 1 in the office

See part 1 of this post here – http://blog.wholi.com/the-somewhat-mental-recipe-for-recruiting-an-amazing-team-part-1/

In the previous post, I talked about ‘the search’ process when it comes to finding new people here at wholi. In this, I’ll look at the next steps – initiating discussions with candidates and using your networks.

Stage Two – Discussions

1) Once you’re at ~process 3) in the previous post, you should also start trying to reach out to the best candidates and begin talking to them. Go slowly at first, you want to learn as you go.

2) We wrote a template email, in Romanian, from my co-founder Raz (who’d won 2x medals in international olympics, got a PhD in AI etc) and then personalised the email in specific places for everyone we wrote to. We were careful to include things that were attractive, and also said that we know ‘you’re probably not looking but it’s always good to make a great connection’. The email is worth spending some time on and, given the investment in time it has taken to find those candidates.

3) We sent small batches of emails, monitoring the response rate and tried to learn what would increase the likelihood of getting a response. We followed on with people who hadn’t responded after a week or so, sometimes finding alternative emails for people if possible. In our case, we received a ~30-50% response rate, perhaps higher later on in the process once word got round. Be careful at this stage – if you’re emailing lots of people who might know one another then you want to make sure they understand that this is part of a process to find the right people. There’s a fine line between spamming and sending emails that are of value to people – in our enthusiasm, we’ve got this wrong before. 

4) When my co-founder got a response, he passed it on to me and I set up a call with the person for 30 minutes.  I also suggested they see our presentation at 500 Startups (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GPIiMrSTB4) to show them what we were about (and to try to further pique their interest). I suggested a quick call even if the person wasn’t willing to look for a new role or said they’re happy where they are. Most great people aren’t looking for something – this is the beginning of the relationship and often conversations that start at this stage can take years to turn into a successful hire. As I write this, I’m sitting opposite a colleague who initially wasn’t interested. I suggested a call and slowly but surely, when we talked more and more he became more excited about wholi and eventually joined us. 

5) During the conversation, I tried to: a) give a good pitch, tell them about the culture we were trying to create and that we’re only hiring the most amazing people, b) take notes on every conversation so I knew what they’d said and c) make sure to ask them who they think the best developers they’d worked with. c) is vital as the more conversations I had, the more often I heard the same names, which enabled me to know exactly who to target. This list of people regularly mentioned became our ‘dream team’ list. If they were friends with other people I was talking to, I’d also ask if they knew that person – no more than that, and monitor reactions (LinkedIn connections are useful for this). These names, if new, were fed back into the spreadsheet and also recorded and sometimes the ranking adapted if people were regularly recommended. As I mentioned at the beginning of the last article, if you already have or know of amazing people ask them who they would work with if they could hire anyone, this can save you a lot of time.

6) If the person was good and interested, I passed them over to Raz for another, more technical conversation and also tried to follow on with some more juicy pieces about the company, to keep them keen. Even if they weren’t interested, I’d recommend they drop into the office sometime for a chat, just so we can at least put a face to the name (this often sparked interest) and sent them materials/reading etc and tried to keep up with them. By the time you’ve got to this stage, you’ve invested a lot to find these gems, so treat them carefully. We keep emailing people until they’ve dropped by to visit us – once they see/get a feel for the office/team, it often changes people’s minds.

7) If after review with Raz there was mutual interest, I would have another longer talk and we’d also schedule in some time to work together, preferably for a half-day or more. There’s nothing quite like spending time working on actual problems with someone to know what they’re really like. Even after following the process above, about 50% of all people who have come for a working day are not hired. On the day itself we’d once again we’d ask for recommendations. Deciding what tests to do (and should be set by your expert in that field) is up to you, but point to the key features you want. Its worth investing time in this process. We also give detailed feedback for every candidate who comes to a working day – if they’ve made the effort to spend a half day with us, we want to be clear what didn’t work constructively so that the candidate gets something out of the process. That’s very important to us – we want the people not selected to leave feeling sad they didn’t get the role, but that the opportunity and team at wholi made the process the best it could be. Make sure you continue to take notes, so that someone else can understand where you are in the process, and what to look for in a candidate. Especially if there are a number of people hiring, but also be careful not to bias decision-making with opinions. I often ask very different questions from Raz (I’m a gut feeling, emotional, EQ person, whereas Raz is a logical, IQ, quantitative brain). Often the two of us will spot different patterns, which can be valuable. 

8) If you decide you do want to hire someone, one of the most important parts of the process is checking references. Use your notes to ask difficult questions of the referees about specific things that are of concern. Also check references with anyone you know who the candidate has not volunteered, to see if there’s a bias (although be careful, given candidates might not want people to know they’re leaving). Get as many references as you can (I went for 5/6 for most people). In addition to checking references, referees can shortcut your ability to learn how best to work with someone. It can take months to ‘discover’ what motivates someone and how to work with them. By asking referees how they would manage that person, or what to look out for, you learn a lot about speeding your process of building an effective working relationship.

9) If people are not interested for whatever reason but are on your ‘dream team’ list, keep in touch with them rolling forward and update them as to the progress of the business, as you would investors. We have a list of 25 or so people we stay in touch with every few months. I add them on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter etc. I post cheeky messages on our Facebook pages with them tagged in ‘future employees’ section (see below). Basically I stalk them and send a continual stream of abuse until they join us 😉

Tagging people who we want to join us...

After a while, if you’ve built the right team, these folks start to let you know when they’re free/interested and what’s happening in the market.

10) I ask my team to keep in touch with these folks (all the best people know each other) We’ve built a Facebook page in which we record some of our company history (and some photos in Wholistory – forgive me) and some of the team trips we’ve been on. We’ve been lucky enough as a company to go on trips to Malta, Sicily, Skiing and to Kenya – these have been amazing fun, excellent bonding experiences and helped us to take time out of the office to set values, assess what’s working and what’s not, etc. This year we’re off to the Romanian countryside, Montenegro and are planning our return to Kenya next Spring. 

Stage Three – Networks 

1) In addition to the above techniques you want to find people who can spot great talent for you. Email and try to develop relationships with key players like university professors, other entrepreneurs and people who will see the kind of candidates you’re after. Try to keep in touch with them every so often.

2) Now that we have an amazing team, our focus has shifted to using the team members to help us with referrals. Again, this is something we’ve built into the wholi product so that we can make finding the right people much easier for us, and we hope you too. We experimented with this and managed to build a list of 100+ people we wanted to hire in the space of about an hour, by asking each of our team to add people from their contacts. 

The process is hard and takes a lot of time… but it’s worth it. I hope this helps.

Good luck, happy hunting. Let me know in the comments if you’ve any further thoughts… 

 

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